Category Archives: In the library

And now, the fun begins

Got me some Lucid, I wancha to know

photo by Jennifer Hess

Do you know how many absinthe cocktails are in the Savoy Cocktail Book? According to the Real Absinthe blog, there are 104. One hundred and four recipes that geeks like me couldn’t easily mix in this country, thanks to the cost and difficulty of acquiring absinthe from overseas.

Now that Lucid is available domestically, those sad days have ended. Hm, 104. If I mixed up one absinthe cocktail a week, I’d have blog fodder for the next two years. I can’t guarantee that I’ll mix them that frequently, but I am damn well going to try all 104 of those drinks, as long as legal absinthe and my liver hold out.

And, no, that’s not a first-edition Savoy; it’s the facsimile release.

“Liquor: The Servant of Man” on eBay

Just a quick follow-up to last night’s post…

If any of you are interested in procuring your own copy of this book, it’s available again on eBay. The printing currently listed is the 1948. The book was originally published in 1939, and my copy is the 1940 reprint.

The 1948 was published by Garden City Pub. Co., whereas the original was under the Little, Brown mark. I can’t tell you whether that makes a difference but I figured I’d point it out.

Bidding war…GO!

Edited to add: There’s a 1965 book with the exact same title–Liquor, the Servant of Man–but by an author named Morris Chavetz. If you’re shopping, buyer beware. I know nothing of the Chavetz volume; it seems fishy that he recycled the title of the earlier book, but beyond that, I know nothing of the ’65.

Talk about timing!

Last week, I was catching up on the cocktail blogs–specifically, I was reading one of my new favorites, Cocktailnerd. Gabriel, the author, wrote up a cool piece on the Blinker. Now, the Blinker’s a drink to try some time, but I’ll have to be careful, because it calls for grapefruit juice, to which Lady Bitters is sadly allergic. (I’ll just fix her a Negroni; that covers a number of sins.)

More to the point, though, Gabriel linked out to an interview with Ted Haigh at Modern Drunkard Magazine. I have hazy memories of having read this interview previously, but I’ve had too many Sazeracs to be sure.
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One down

logo for Imbibe magazineHappy birthday, Imbibe magazine! It’s been a great first year, and here’s a toast to many more. Issue 7 hit my mailbox yesterday, and I must confess that since it arrived the same day as this issue of Esquire, I didn’t open Imbibe first.

(Even my wife saw Halle and said, “Wwwwow!”)

But I closeted my hormones, stirred up martinis, grabbed a cigar, and repaired out back to enjoy the warm weather and browse Imbibe.
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Choke Artist

I’ve been in the weeds lately, starting a new job and finishing several freelance projects. Although we’ve certainly enjoyed our nightly aperitifs, I’ve had little time for anything more than old stand-bys, like Martinis and Old Fashioneds.

But things are calming down finally, so it’s time again for research and experimentation. To that end, I delved back into a book that I bought a few months ago but haven’t taken time to review: The Art of the Bar. In flipping through it, I found a flavor combination that really surprised me–Cynar, tequila, and sherry–in a drink aptly named Choke Artist.

Choke Artist

photograph by Jennifer Hess

Here’s why I’m no professional: I’d have never thought to match up these ingredients. But this drink just works. It’s the very definition of a well-balanced drink–everything’s present and notable, but nothing dominates. You can learn a lot about mixing from this drink.

It reminds me a lot of those friendships we’ve all been a part of, where two strong personalities need a third, more laid-back, person to mediate the differences and smooth things out for everyone. That’s the role of the sherry here.

Finally, the bitters. Even with five dashes’ worth, they’re subtle.

But you should not be subtle. Instead, be fearless. Try it.

Choke Artist

from The Art of the Bar, by Jeff Hollinger and Rob Schwartz

  • 1 ounce Cynar
  • 1 ounce Gran Centenario Anejo tequila (I used Tequila Espolon Reposado, which I had on hand)
  • ½ ounce fino sherry
  • 5 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters No. 6
  • Extra-wide orange twist for garnish

Technique: Combine the Cynar, tequila, and sherry in an ice-filled mixing glass and stir. Add the bitters to a chilled snifter and roll around to coat the glass. Pour the Cynar and tequila mixture into the snifter. Garnish with the orange twist.

Embury and his fine art

Embury's "Fine Art"

photograph by Jennifer Hess

The 1948 first edition of David A. Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. This thing usually sells for upwards of $150-200, but Jen got it for a steal, from an online vendor who apparently didn’t know what he/she had. Although the dust jacket is missing, the condition of the book itself is excellent, with just a few scratches on the cover and a stamp on the edge of the book. But no tears, dogears, or obvious wear on the pages. Bargain!

Imbibe’s Karen Foley in a video interview

Kevin at TasteTV.com writes to tell me of Karen Foley’s interview on the TasteTV site. (Thanks, Kevin!) Karen talks about the ideas behind Imbibe magazine. The interview appears to be a couple of months old because they talk only about the first two issues, but it’s worth a watch if you haven’t seen it.

Unless your broadband is fast like Speedy Gonzalez, I advise you to let the video fully load before you watch.

http://services.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f8/271552851

Here’s a direct link, if you’d rather go out to TasteTV to watch.

Tiki Talky

tiki mask

For the tiki-crazed among you, American Heritage has just published an excerpt from Wayne Kramer’s book, And a Bottle of Rum, which I keep bloody-well meaning to read. The excerpt focuses on Tiki culture and the histories of Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic. They’ve paired the excerpt with a James Teitelbaum review of ten tiki bars. Makes me wanna open the rum.

New mag for drinks nerds!

logo for Imbibe magazineHaving seen a number of bloggers discussing the new magazine Imbibe, I dispatched my lovely wife last week to track down a copy, to read during our flight to Alabama. She found the first issue for sale at Borders and brought it home for me. I’m still working my way through it, but so far, I’m really enjoying it.

Imbibe is a drinks magazine, and as such, it covers a range of beverages—coffees, teas, beers, spirits, and wines. (I’d love to see features on specialty colas, root and ginger beers, and other soft drinks.) The first issue contains articles on hotel bars, the drinks culture of Oaxaca, Ted Haigh, Trappist ales, and organic wines. It’s a fun magazine that fills a heretofore open niche.

A lot of magazines have come and gone in the last couple of years—Radar (twice) and Chow are the ones I most lament. This seems to be a hard time to keep a new magazine afloat, but then perhaps it was ever thus. It’s hard to say how long Imbibe will succeed. Nevertheless, I’ve voted with my credit card and purchased a subscription. (Actually, due to incompetent use of a web browser, I seem to have purchased two subscriptions. I’ve been on the web for a decade; I have no excuse.)

As I mentioned earlier, the premiere highlights twelve hotel bars. Among the bars featured is Bistro Moderne in Houston’s Hotel Derek. The write-up discusses a Moderne specialty cocktail, the Texan, providing only the ingredients (Woodford Reserve bourbon, Sauza Conmemorativo tequila, and lime juice) and not the proportions.

I was intrigued but nervous about the bourbon/tequila mix, but since we have both ingredients at home, as well as plenty of limes, I wanted to try it. I had no idea what proportions to use, so I winged it. In a mixing glass, I poured three ounces Very Old Barton bourbon, two ounces Herradura Añejo, and one ounce lime juice (for two cocktails). I sampled just a bit of that and found it a little harsh, so I added half an ounce of simple syrup. I shook that over ice and strained it into two cocktail glasses.

Jen and I both liked it, but we felt it was lacking complexity. The sweetness was fine—any more than half an ounce of simple syrup would have been too sweet. I started thinking about bitters, and since triple sec is a common companion for tequila, I thought about Gary Regan and his orange bitters.

Good thought. Our second batch went as follows, and it was, we felt, a better mix:

The Texan

  • 1½ oz. Very Old Barton bourbon
  • 1 oz. Herradura Añejo tequila
  • ½ oz. lime juice
  • ¼ oz. simple syrup
  • 3 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters

Shake over ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

I’ll happily entertain suggestions for garnishes. I left the drink naked. Salted rim? Lime twist?

Meanwhile, let’s all raise a toast to Imbibe’s long life.