Coming down from Mexico

A few highlights and personal notes from my press trip to Mexico to see Olmeca Altos tequila being distilled.

Monday, March 24:

Got up at 5:30am to meet a car outside the apartment at 6:15 to head to LaGuardia. After getting through security, I grabbed breakfast and settled in to wait for boarding. After I ate, I checked in with Jen. She told me the boy missed me, so I talked to him via FaceTime. It was my first trip away from the kids, so it was hard.

Landed at Houston Intercontinental. Named for a painter who was a third-rate despot, or maybe for his father. Not sure. Had a long layover here, so I wound up at Third Bar, in Terminal B. Decent fried-oyster po-boy. Microbrew from some local place, pretty good. Outlets underneath the bar for recharging phones and laptops? Brilliant. Good work, Third Bar. Have no idea when I’ll ever fly through Houston again, but I’ll look you up. I got yer digits.

Guadalajara. Flew in over mountains, lush valleys, massive lakes. Could tell just from the air that it was going to be a geographically stunning place. The airport is Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla International Airport, named for a leader of the Mexican War for Independence. Seems they know how to name an airport. We had an airport named for a leader of the American War for Independence. We renamed it for an actor who was a third-rate despot. So much for patriotism.

Nicely modern airport, more so than, ohhhhhhhhhh, LaGuardia. Customs and Immigration was smooth, quick, and friendly. Swapped dollars for pesos, grabbed my luggage, and met my group. We took a van ride to Arandas, home to the Pernod facility that makes Olmec Altos tequila, checked into the hotel, got cleaned up, had a couple of drinks, and went to dinner.

Tuesday, March 25:

Breakfast, and then van ride to distillery. I had seen something in a very early email from the trip organizers, mentioning something about a quad-bike trip to the agave fields. I assumed we’d bike a short distance to a nearby field. Nope. We took a two-hour scenic trip through Jalisco, across paved roads, gravel, cobblestone, dirt, dust, and mud. At one point, the convoy slowed because two guys up front nearly hit a cow who crossed the road. Dogs, most of them friendly, chased us a few times. We biked past a couple of fires burning in the brush right alongside the road. I took a turn without enough caution and nearly crashed into a tree. The worst, though, was near the end, when the wind kicked up hard enough to drive white dust into our eyes, blinding us even though we all wore safety goggles.

Lunch in the agave fields: tacos, grilled meats and cactus, chicarones, enchiladas. And Palomas, lots of Palomas. All done up in the Mexican way. In America, you ask for a Paloma and you get tequila, grapefruit juice (squeezed in front of you!), lime, sugar, a hint of salt, club soda. In Mexico, they use Squirt, tequila, a splash of lime, and pinch of salt. I like that version better, and not just because grapefruit fucks up my statins.

Back to distillery, and then to hotel for a long shower to scrub off the road dust. Then dinner. Place is called Taqueria Don Chepe. Inside two garage bays, nondescript, full of local families sharing platters of food. Amazing tacos, just stunning.

Wednesday, March 26:

Distillery tour. I’ve already written it up here. Lunch out, and then depart Arandas to return to Guadalajara. Long afternoon of resting, and then dinner and drinks.

Thursday, March 27:

Walking tour of Tlaquepaque, with a chill, charming open-air shopping plaza full of antique stores, boutiques, and galleries. The area is known for pottery and blown glass, but I got Jen a beautiful silver necklace, and for Mirabelle I bought a lovely hand-sewn shirt and skirt. (Julian got a toy-airplane set from the airport.)

We also toured a farmer’s market inside an old parking garage, where Altos’s brand ambassador, Daniel Warrilow, bought produce for a cocktail seminar later that afternoon. We left Tlaquepaque and went to a separate hotel, where the organizers had rented out the pool bar for the afternoon, so we could learn to make cocktails. I’ll have more on those cocktails in a later post.

Our last dinner in Mexico was at a place called i Latina Restaurante, serving Thai-Mexican fusion. Good lord. I mean, you might think that fusion is played out, and I might think that fusion is played out, but there’s nothing about i Latina that’s played out. The food was phenomenal, possibly the best of the trip. I had a Tuna and Scallop Tartare that was just amazing. On a very meat-heavy trip, to have such delicate seafood was a treat.

Friday, March 28:

Homeward. Bittersweet.

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